Tuesday, April 18, 2017

A better March Madness script?

Last year, I wrote an article for Linux Journal describing how to create a Bash script to build your NCAA "March Madness" brackets. I don't really follow basketball, but I have friends that do, so by filling out a bracket at least I can have a stake in the games.

Since then, I realized my script had a bug that prevented any rank 16 team from winning over a rank 1 team. So this year, I wrote another article for Linux Journal with an improved Bash script to build a better NCAA "March Madness" bracket. In brief, the updated script builds a custom random "die roll" based on the relative strength of each team. My "predictions" this year are included in the Linux Journal article.

Since the games are now over, I figured this was a great time to see how my bracket performed. If you followed the games, you know that there were a lot of upsets this year. No one really predicted the final two teams for the championship. So maybe I shouldn't be too surprised if my brackets didn't do well either. Next year might be a better comparison.

In the first round of the NCAA March Madness, you start with teams 1–16 in four regions, so that's 64 teams that compete in 32 games. In that "round of 64," my shell script correctly predicted 21 outcomes. That's not a bad start.

March Madness is single-elimination, so for the second round, you have 32 teams competing in 16 games. My shell script correctly guessed 7 of those games. So just under half were predicted correctly. Not great, but not bad.

In the third round, my brackets suffered. This is the "Sweet Sixteen" where 16 teams compete in 8 games, but my script only predicted 2 of those games.

And in the fourth round, the "Elite Eight" round, my script didn't predict any of the winners. And that wrapped up my brackets.

Following the standard method for how to score "March Madness" brackets, each round has 320 possible points. In round one, assign 10 points for each correctly selected outcome. In round two, assign 20 points for each correct outcome. And so on, double the possible points at each round. From that, the math is pretty simple.

round one:21 × 10 =210
round two:7 × 20 =140
round three:1 × 40 =40
round four:0 × 80 =0
390
My total score this year is 390 points. As a comparison, last year's script (the one with the bug) scored 530 in one instance, and 490 in another instance. But remember that there were a lot of upsets in this year's games, so everyone's brackets fared poorly this year, anyway.

Maybe next year will be better.

Did you use the Bash script to help fill out your "March Madness" brackets? How did you do?

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.