Tuesday, March 21, 2017

LibreOffice 5.3.1 is out

Last week, LibreOffice released version 5.3.1. This seems to be an incremental release over 5.3 and doesn't seem to change the new user interface in any noticeable way.

This is both good and bad news for me. As you know, I have been experimenting with LibreOffice 5.3 since LibreOffice updated the user interface. Version 5.3 introduced the "MUFFIN" interface. MUFFIN stands for My User Friendly Flexible INterface. Because someone clearly wanted that acronym to spell "MUFFIN." The new interface is still experimental, so you'll need to activate it through Settings→Advanced. When you restart LibreOffice, you can use the View menu to change modes.

So on the one hand, I'm very excited for the new release!

But on the other hand, the timing is not great. Next week would have been better. Clearly, LibreOffice did not have my interests in mind when they made this release.

You see, I teach an online CSCI class about the Usability of Open Source Software. Really, it's just a standard CSCI usability class. The topic is open source software because there are some interesting usability cases there that bear discussion. And it allows students to pick their own favorite open source software project that they use in a real usability test for their final project.

This week, we are doing a usability test "mini-project." This is a "dry run" for the students to do their own usability test for the first time. Each student is doing the test with one participant each, but using the same program. We're testing the new user interface in LibreOffice 5.3, using Notebookbar in Contexttual Groups mode.

So we did all this work to prep for the usability test "mini-project" using LibreOffice 5.3, only for the project to release version 5.3.1 right before we do the test. So that's great timing, there.

But I kid. And the new version 5.3.1 seems to have the same user interface path in Notebookbar-Contextual Groups. So our test should bear the same results in 5.3 or 5.3.1.

This is an undergraduate class project, and will not generate statistically significant results like a formal usability test in academic research. But the results of our test may be useful, nonetheless. I'll share an overview of our results next week.

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